Gshytt and Young: Hip-Hop’s Dynamic Duo on Brotherly Love and Global Success

[from l to r] Gshytt and Young/ Courtesy of Karen Sanders, PR
On a Saturday morning, at the end of July, Florida natives, Gshytt and Young’s chemistry bounced off of one another like your favorite collaboration, as we discussed humble upbringings, the power of a successful mindset, and eternal giving.

These two evolving artists, are graciously expanding their love for creating music that embodies the genuine side of success; and who better to be on the come-up with than your own tight-bonded, brother.

As a recording artist, and record producer, sharing the commonality of passion through self-owned label, G.O.D. Familia, the Mount Dora raised artists, are more than the music, as they are on a journey to reach others in more ways than one.

Their “quicksand-like,” environmental upbringing, as Gshytt describes it, was a decision of sticking around and becoming stuck, or venturing out and rising above the narrative.

He did just that, claiming remarkable resume credentials with one of his many talents, dancing, by being a part of films such as “Stomp the Yard,” “Honey 2,” and sharing the presence of trailblazers including, Beyoncé, Rihanna, and Ciara. “Most importantly, shout out to being in the presence of powerful black women. My first experience was back with Rihanna, I think around the time when she collabed with Jeezy on the video, “Hard.” Rihanna is the type of person who, you can smell her before you hear her; that’s just how great she was. When you see her, you can just tell she stands for something. Beyoncé, she’s on a whole nother level. Just knowing that path of how they built themselves up in the industry, in a music industry that can taint your image. I was selected to be a part of the short film “Haunted,” [from Beyoncé’s self-titled visual album], and just being a part of that and having on our G.O.D. Familia gear, was taking it to another level, and inspired me being in that presence. Ciara is so energetic. Me coming out into the dance world, it was good to see how much she appreciated the dancers. She treated everybody important, from the artists, to the dancers, and all the way down. Also, growing up in a single parent home, with my mother, we just took her qualities, from a women. And now being in the entertainment industry, we become even more inspired by that. I expect to work with them again.”

To conquer doubts of their biggest dreams, it took one thing that both brothers could depend on in order to constructively operate their lives, and now business as Young explained: football. “We would pretty much run a business and operate in life like a football game. The main thing about this, was the accountability. The passion we had on the field, we pretty much flipped that into the music. We grew up listening to music, in the locker room we would listen to music, and that kind of fueled everything that we’re doing down to the competitive side. It’s pretty much based off sports. That was our number one passion, playing football, from seven-years-old, to high school and college ball too.”

Sports did more than motivate these two, it also introduced them to a new setting that would forever change their life, Brazil. After being embraced into the soccer team, The Cadences, post the 2012 World Cup, native Brazilians took an interest in their music, and the rap phenomenon made for a smooth transition within Gshytt’s records.

Brazil was just an ounce of Gshytt’s and Young’s traveling experiences, which have ranged from filming music videos in Greece, and their dominant purpose, reaching out to families and creating new opportunities for the people of Zimbabwe.

[l to r] Young, Brazilian soccer play Neymar da Silva Santos Junior, and Gshytt/ Courtesy of Karen Sanders, PR
However, sometimes traveling can put a long time stamp on their personal lives. Young, who has a 7-year-old son, said it’s important to maximize the time we’re given to spend with our loved ones, especially under the circumstances that you’re only seeing them in entirety once or twice a year, according to Gshytt.

Both are experts in managing the respect and love they have for their careers and family, in a whirlwind of being all over the world. Besides, it’s almost impossible to view nonstop traveling as a negative attribute, especially when it’s for the better good.

Gshytt and Young, have made it a top priority to always give back within not only their own communities, but those of others, expanding to some of the world’s largest continents, but more centrally in Africa. “The whole giving back thing is a no brainer. At the end of the day, it’s like why wouldn’t you extend your hand to give to someone. We all need help. Language is one thing, but all people understand love, people understand care, and hate. If I go out here and slap someone in the face, it’ll be heavily publicized. That’s why I really don’t like showing people I’m doing good, because when you’re an entertainer, there’s always some craziness to it. I had to talk to God, and tell God, “I have to be stronger.” When you do something good for somebody, and you see that response it feels good. I think it’s something everybody should do, go into these communities and have some humility. Embrace other people culture, and embrace them so they don’t feel like they have to go to a certain level. Every country we go into, we walk into it like we’re walking into someone’s home,” Young said.

GSHYTT and Young photographed with Sean2 Miles and the youth of Zimbabwe/ Photo courtesy of Karen Sanders, PR

As they’re finding inspiration in those across the world, the motivational drive and admiration they’ve gained for those within the industry, amount to the same qualities.

Icons and pioneers in several different forms of developing crafts, including Jay-Z, Oprah, Floyd Mayweather, our greatest historical figures, such as Harriet Tubman, football players, Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders, and even the women back in the day selling snacks to the kids on the black, have all plated a major role in the moves, and studies Gshytt and Young have taken upon their music, and life in general. But nothing beats gathering inspiration from someone who’s literally been right there from the jump, according to Gshytt who labels Young as the first person who inspired him. “I’m just so inspired by greatness. I like Floyd Mayweather, Rick Ross, Jay Z, because that’s the level I seen myself on when I was locked in that room, writing these hits. “What level do you want to do it on?” That’s what I used to ask myself. These people, I have studied their habits. How are you 50-0, but going hard like you 0-50? I know the environments of where Rick Ross grew up in Florida. There’s a lot of different parts of Florida, but Florida is Florida, so I visualized his environment, and thought if he could do it, I could do it. Jay-Z and Bun B on that boat, on the “Big Pimpin,” video, I was like that’s me and bro on the tip of that boat. Two years later, we’re in the same position shooting a music video in Greece. I just respect greatness, I respect those levels.”

Be on the look out for Gshytt’s upcoming project, “Global Trotta,” executive produced by Young, along with follow-up, “Trap Funk,” a crossover of Brazilian Funk music, and American trap.

From their positive demeanor, and all around passion for what they’ve worked hard to do, Gshytt and Young, are guaranteed one way, and that’s up. Or in their own words of their upcoming success, “Just trying to make this thing, worldwide!”

Diamond Jones

Jr. Editor Lifestlye/Entertainment Department

Diamond Jones, 21, is a St.Louis native, born on the west side of Detroit. She is currently a junior, studying Journalism, with a minor in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Her writing reaches to audiences everywhere, directing it toward the empowerement and excellence of black people and their accomplishments. She has written for The Daily Egyptian, LoveThisTrackTV, Georgia State’s The Signal and the National Association of Black Journalists, which she is a dedicated member of. She hopes to continue to inspire those through her words and make those who feel underrepresented, see their light.