Actress Lindsey Blackwell is the Next Generation’s Blueprint

Lindsey Blackwell spent her 30-minute lunch periods by request in the principal’s office, but not for the reasons you may think. Outside of her circle, attracted to her bubbly and fun-spirited personality, you could find her practicing her model walk in the front office hallway with administrative support.

Photo courtesy of Lindsey Blackwell/@lindseybwell on Instagram

A child of the arts, growing up as a performer within the Actors, Models & Talent for Christ Program (AMTC), a non-profit with the goal of preparing young creatives for the entertainment field, Blackwell made her mark at just the age of four, winning Best Overall Actress from her “I Need A Job” monologue. 

Now, at the age of 13, and with a personality as bright as her future, the actress is transitioning into the “What It’s Like To Be A Teenager Today,” phase, but without a doubt is handling it professionally and gracefully in addition to her career take-off. “I have to be more responsible now that I’m a teenager. I’m held accountable more, and the expectations have gotten bigger. I’m more aware and observant now that I’m a teenager. I also have more opportunities for sports now that I’m in middle school.”

Blackwell’s day-to-day is like no other; specially crafted and nothing short of inspiring. She’s the co-captain of her school’s flag football team, consisting of a majority of her male peers and just one other girl. Between being disciplined by maintaining her studies, while balancing auditions and filming, her role as co-captain has taught her leadership skills she says and taking the compassionate side when redirecting which sometimes works.

Blackwell serves as the co-captain for her school’s Flag Football team

I have to be more responsible now that I’m a teenager. I’m held accountable more, and the expectations have gotten bigger.”

Her recent endeavor also allows her to understand the struggles of her male counterparts; young, black men as portrayed in Tarell Alvin McCraney’s (“Moonlight”) created OWN series, David Makes Man. Lindsey plays the role of Marissa, a sassy and intelligent individual who’s not afraid to clap back, in this coming-of-age story about navigating between two worlds–where you come from and where you’re going. “I’ve learned that Black men go through many problems on a day-to-day basis. Whether it’s racism, inequality or mental health issues. Sometimes they’ll bottle up their emotions and they won’t have anyone to talk to about their problems, so that’s what’s causing those mental health issues. I pay attention now with Black men because I have a little brother, I have my dad and my guy friends. I pay attention to the red flags just in case they need help. The best part about filming is being able to work with all these amazing people, and they have shown me that you need to put your heart and soul in any project that you work on.”

 

This accounts for the likes of TV and film veterans such as Phylicia Rashad, Ruban Santiago-Hudson, Lela Rochon, and in her past projects being able to star alongside Jason Bateman and Ryan Reynolds in The Change-Up, and Lance Gross and Jurnee Smollett-Bell, where she would play 6-year-old Judith in Tyler Perry’s Temptation

The Atlanta native can be seen all around the peach state. In recent years being the face of a huge campaign for the Georgia Aquarium, and also booking several commercials, print and voice-over roles for Georgia Power, AT&T, Cartoon Network, Ford, Graco, and Publix. 

I’ve learned that Black men go through many problems on a day-to-day basis. Whether it’s racism, inequality or mental health issues, and sometimes they’ll bottle up their emotions and they won’t have anyone to talk to about their problems, so that’s what’s causing those mental health issues. I pay attention now with Black men because I have a little brother, I have my dad and my guy friends. I pay attention to the red flags just in case they need help.”

However, the most memorable and unforgettable childhood moment would have to be being photographed with one of her biggest supporters, her father, William Blackwell, in Essence Magazine for Luster’s Pink Oil “Daddy Did It” ad campaign. “They’re [family] super supportive. My mom, she helps me learn my lines and she’s there when I’m filming the auditions. She makes sure I’m safe and she’s been really instrumental in my acting career so far.”

Photographed by Priscilla Saunders

With hopes of one day working with Zendaya, Storm Reid and Ava DuVernay, trailblazers who Blackwell believes are the perfect examples of black women in the entertainment industry and role models, this little lady isn’t too far behind those names. She’s set to star in NBC drama, Council of Dads as Tess for the mid-2020 season. “Just be yourself and don’t compare yourself to other people in the industry. That could sometimes change your way of thinking. I would say make sure you work hard and put your all into what you’re doing.

At the end of the day when she’s not practicing lines, doing a live interview or in the process of filming pilots and finales, Lindsey Blackwell is your average kid who binges Netflix, plays with her dog and loves catching up on her sleep.

Her head is still prioritized in the books, physically attending school by day and continuing to dominate her influential role within generation Z full-time.

Be sure to keep up with Lindsey Blackwell on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @lindseybwell.

 

Diamond Jones

Jr. Editor Lifestlye/Entertainment Department

Diamond Jones, 21, is a St.Louis native, born on the west side of Detroit. She is currently a junior, studying Journalism, with a minor in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Her writing reaches to audiences everywhere, directing it toward the empowerement and excellence of black people and their accomplishments. She has written for The Daily Egyptian, LoveThisTrackTV, Georgia State’s The Signal and the National Association of Black Journalists, which she is a dedicated member of. She hopes to continue to inspire those through her words and make those who feel underrepresented, see their light.