Playboy Magazine Removes Nudity from its Major Platforms

“If you’re a man between the ages of 18 and 80, Playboy is meant for you,” he wrote in the first issue. “We want to make it clear from the very start, we aren’t a ‘family magazine.’ If you’re somebody’s sister, wife or mother-in-law and picked us up by mistake, please pass us along to the man in your life and get back to your Ladies Home Companion.”

– Hue Hefner

Photo Credit: Playboy's 1953 Debut, Marilyn Monroe
Photo Credit: Playboy’s 1953 Debut, Marilyn Monroe

Hue Hefner never hid the magazine’s intentions. In the very first issue, which is graced with a bought image of Marilyn Monroe, Hefner explains the lifestyle of a Playboy man, “We enjoy mixing up cocktails and a hors d’oeuvre or two, putting a little mood music on the phonograph and inviting in a female acquaintance for a quiet discussion on Picasso, Nietzche, jazz, sex…” Readers purchased Playboy because they could constantly beat out their competition.

Fast forward 62 years, nudity and porn are as easily accessible as finding the nearest restaurant on your mobile device, for free. At its peak, Playboy’s circulation was 5.6 million.  Now in the digital age, it’s dropped and remained at a constant 800,000 according to Alliance for Audited Media.

This is a new era.  Cory Jones, a top editor at Playboy, sought out Hefner at his humbled abode last month (The Playboy Mansion) and propositioned the idea to cease nudity.

According to The New York Times, Playboy magazine has taken a new direction in their marketing and distribution. The new Playboy magazine will no longer be a host to full-blown nudity.  It’s no longer an all boy’s club. Instead, its centerfolds will cover up in PG-13 scantily clad clothing. Some other changes will be making the sex columnist a female, expanding liquor coverage, and including more in-depth investigative journalism.

In the summer of 2014, Playboy made a similar decision to adopt a more modern, clean, and work-safe website. According to Playboy executives, the average reader dropped from 47 to just over 30 and web traffic jumped from almost four million unique monthly visitors to 16 million.

Hopefully the same effect will trickle down into the magazine’s circulation.

 

 

Claire Howard

Journalist

Claire Howard is a Howard University graduate who fell in love with pen and paper. Creative writing and fashion drive her, and have propelled her into a career in public relations and branding. Formally trained at Moki Media in Washington, D.C., Claire has worked with clients such as New York Times Best-Selling author Wes Moore, international photographer Nigel Barker, The McBride Sisters and their vino label Truvee Wine, Blo Blow Dry Bar and many more. In early 2015, Claire started her own Public Relations firm, LLM Works, based in Washington, D.C. LLM provides branding and communications services to clients in entertainment, health and fitness, and the beauty and fashion industries